Boxing Cinema: The Square Jungle (1955)

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Pat Quaid, an alcoholic San Francisco widower, ends up in jail. His grocery-clerk son, Eddie, needs $25 to bail him out. When he can’t borrow it, Eddie enters an amateur fight contest and wins it.

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Sean Mooney vs. Bryan Woon Chess boxing bout in the “Intellectual Fight Club”

Chess boxing is alternating rounds of chess and boxing.

A Chess boxing bout

Chess and boxing really do not fit together! That sounds like promoting ice hockey in Africa or letting Einstein compete in the Strongman Competition. But sometimes you get into such thought experiments and you have wonderful ideas. Chess and boxing are complementary; They are, however, brain teasers and martial arts # 1. Pack them together and create a whole new world. A world that breaks through prejudice and brings body and mind together. In the competition, the fighters compete alternately in chess and boxing rounds (maximum 11 rounds), until a checkmate or KO goes.

Iepe Rubingh

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“The Untouchable”- Nicolino Locche Spotlight

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Nicolino Locche (September 2, 1939 – September 7, 2005) was an Argentine boxer from Tunuyán, Mendoza who held the World Light welterweight title from 1968 to 1972. Locche is often cited as one of the finest defensive boxers of all time. Locche was known as “El Intocable” (“The Untouchable“) due to his defensive mastery. He is one boxer I have studied closely to best learn how to master defensive fighting skills.

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International Olympic Committee (IOC) has announced that it will be regulating—and possibly punishing—expressions of protest at the 2020 Tokyo Olympic

“Racism, gun control, mistreatment of immigrants, and a president who spreads hate are at the top of a long list” of issues that need to be addressed. Berry said she was protesting social injustice in America, and that it was “too important to not say something.”

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Race Imboden and Gwen Berry

This decision to censor personal opinion and expression comes in part as a response to events last fall at the Pan-American Games where athletes Race Imboden and Gwen Berry kneeled and raised a fist, respectively, during their medal ceremonies. But the tradition of Olympic protest dates back more than half a century, most famously seen at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics when Tommie Smith and John Carlos raised their fists to protest injustice.

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Tommie Smith and John Carlos (1968)

Tommie Smith and John Carlos were kicked out of the Olympics and suspended from the U.S. team. Whatever endorsements and financial opportunities their medals would have brought were not forthcoming. They even received death threats. But on November 1, 2019 Smith and Carlos were finally inducted into the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Hall of Fame, an honor bestowed because of their “character, conduct and off-field contributions,” as well as their athletic achievements. I guess it’s never too late to acknowledge the Committee were wrong.

Why take a stand?


In a tweet sent shortly after his team’s medals ceremony at the Pan Am Games, Race Imboden said the following:

“Racism, gun control, mistreatment of immigrants, and a president who spreads hate are at the top of a long list” of issues that need to be addressed. Berry said she was protesting social injustice in America, and that it was “too important to not say something.”

“The Korean Hawk”: Jung-Koo Chang Spotlight

Jung-Koo Chang (38 win, 17 KO; 4 loss, 1 KO) was not one of the many amateur standouts from the Korean school, but rather a street tough from the mean streets of Busan who took up boxing as a 12-year-old after watching a world title fight on TV and fought for his first world title before his 20th birthday.

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Jung-Koo Chang (38 win, 17 KO; 4 loss, 1 KO) was not one of the many amateur standouts from the Korean school, but rather a street tough from the mean streets of Busan who took up boxing as a 12-year-old after watching a world title fight on TV and fought for his first world title before his 20th birthday.

Continue reading ““The Korean Hawk”: Jung-Koo Chang Spotlight”

NY Lawyer Lands KO for Boxer Client

World Boxing Super Series Semi Final fight between Latvian boxer Mairis Briedis, left, and Polish boxer Krzysztof Glowacki, right, held at Arena Riga in Riga, Latvia, on June 15, 2019.

Boxing may be one of the most violent sports, but when two champions have a dispute, they settle it like everyone else: With lawyers in court. More specifically, the World Boxing Organization Complaint and Grievance Committee, where a panel of three arbitrators just issued a rare appellate decision, ordering a new fight between Krzysztof Glowacki and Mairis Briedis.

The decision is a win for Glowacki, a Polish fighter who was represented by Scott Shaffer, a New York-based partner at Olshan Frome Wolosky who has carved out a niche practice representing boxers. A former sportswriter and officer of the Boxing Writers Association of America, Shaffer argued that his client got a raw deal when he faced off against Briedis on June 15, 2019 in Latvia.

Read more at Law.com